The Haynes manual for Heathrow Airport is launched!

Haynes, the book brand best known for its car maintenance manuals, has gone under the hood of a far bigger beast – Heathrow Airport!

Heathrow manual

Keeping Heathrow running is, of course, an astonishing operation which most of us take for granted. You are looking at an airport which handles 70 million people per year, employs 76000 people and handles 1400 takes offs and landings each day.

Apparently, each A380 departure from Heathrow has been loaded with 35,000 individual items, if you count right down to the last teaspoon!

To quote from the PR spiel:

In the Heathrow Airport Manual, author Robert Wicks has examined every element of the airport from runway construction and maintenance, to the complex airspace around London and how the airport deals with emergencies. Most importantly, the book reflects on the role Heathrow has played in the nation’s success over the past 70 years and the importance of global connections to the UK’s future.

Written with the full co-operation of Heathrow, NATS and the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the manual is the first of its kind and provides unprecedented insight and access to every aspect of the airport.

With more than 250 colour photographs and technical illustrations, this book brings together the challenges of daily operations at the world’s busiest international airport.

Christmas is still quite a way away, but it may make a decent gift for the airline fanatic in your life (which is probably yourself, if we’re honest). It sells for £21.99, although Amazon has it for £14.73.

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Comments

  1. Just wondering and not being critical but do you use too many commas?

    • Brian says:

      It seems to me that Raffles uses them correctly. As a rule of thumb, commas are used where there would be a slight pause in spoken language. Try reading the text out loud, and you’ll see what I mean. The fact that commas have fallen by the wayside recently, so that you get texts without them, doesn’t mean that this is correct.

      • Exactly. Over 40s probably use more than you young uns …..!

        • The writing is great I’m not denying it. I just have never seen so many commas in all my life in print or on screen. Thanks for the clarifications and not burning me at the stake.

          • Luke, I think you meant:

            “The writing is great; I’m not denying it. I just have never seen so many commas in all my life — in print or on screen. Thanks for the clarifications, and for not burning me at the stake.”

            😉

          • squills says:

            Just weaning my 11-year-old off ‘[comma], and’ as he has his SATS in a few days’ time 😉

            Not always a mistake but the comma in ‘[comma], and’ and ‘[comma], but’ can usually be omitted – and your sentence will read better for it lol

          • I would without doubt have put something between ‘great’ and ‘I’m’, which is frankly appalling :-) Kids today etc.

            I would have left the last sentence as you wrote it, although I would have added the ‘for’. Kids today etc.

            Honestly can’t decide if I would have added a comma to the 2nd sentence or not!

          • Chris C says:

            Commas can also be used to separate out information that could be taken out yet leave the sentence understandable.

            So the original sentence

            “Haynes, the book brand best known for its car maintenance manuals, has gone under the hood of a far bigger beast – Heathrow Airport!”

            Could have been written as

            “Haynes has gone under the hood of a far bigger beast – Heathrow Airport!”

            Though this makes the assumption that everyone knows the sort of books Haynes produce rather than being a generic book publisher.

    • Rob’s use of commas is pretty much perfect, as far as I can tell:

      http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/comma

      In fact, some people would even add an extra one: an “Oxford comma” before the final item of the list in para two.

      One of the things I really appreciate about HFP is the quality of the writing. Far better grammar than many travel blogs.

      • squills says:

        I think I’d have switched that last ‘which’ to ‘who’ 😉

    • whiskerxx says:

      Luke – who was wondering? Did you mean “! was”?

    • I spotted this in Sky Mall recently, which amused me (OK, so I was bored!)

      http://www.amazon.com/TeeShirtPalace-Grandma-Commas-Lives-T-Shirt/dp/B00DUFVLSW/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

  2. squills says:
  3. Andrew says:

    Maybe someone should send a copy to the team at Berlin-Brandenburg.

  4. You should probably not bring this book through TSA checkpoints.

    Regarding the comma issue: I find that commas are increasingly being used where one should properly be using a fullstop or a semi-colon, because using a comma creates a run-on sentence (that is what I was taught, at least). This phenomenon is especially pervasive in the English used in my business e-mails, so much so that I find myself using commas incorrectly now.