Earn 3,000 Avios for a 2-night stay with Worldhotels

You may not have heard of Worldhotels, which is an independent marketing group for 500 upscale hotels, spread across 65 countries. These are hotels which do not want to formally join a branded chain but still want to be able to offer their guests loyalty benefits and to benefit from global marketing campaigns.

You can find our more about Worldhotels here.

Worldhotels

It is currently offering a very attractive promotion with 3,000 Avios points with any 2-night stay. 170 of their hotels are taking part in the promotion.

Full details and the participating properties can be found here. The promotion runs until the end of 2015.

Please note that this is an Iberia Plus promotion. You do NOT get 3,000 Avios by showing a BA or avios.com card. 

To take part, you will need to open an Iberia Plus account, give that number to the hotel at check-in, and then after the Avios have posted, transfer them to BA or avios.com using ‘Combine My Avios’.

That isn’t a massive strain, though. And it has an extra upside, as you will have an ‘active’ Iberia Plus account which will allow you to move Avios into Iberia Plus and take advantage of their lower taxes on Iberia long-haul redemptions.

If you take Avios for your stay, you will not also earn Peakpoints in the Worldhotels loyalty scheme – although the miles are probably better value.

(Want to earn more Avios?  Click here to see our latest articles on earning and spending your points and click here to see our list of current Avios promotions.)

Don't be caught out by the new DVLA rules on car hire
A Marriott Rewards feature I had forgotten - you can book rewards without having the points
About Head for Points

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Comments

  1. Deenesh says:

    Can’t say it came out of the blue. There has been frantic discussion on this topic for months on many of the travel blogs/web boards I visit.

  2. Brian Peers says:

    I can’t help but feel this is a problem generated by the media.
    In 10 years of renting cars overseas, over 50 rentals, not once have I been asked for my counterpart..
    The two times I have been asked has been renting a van in Reading.

    So whats the outcome, thousands of people travelling overseas requesting a code when they don’t need one, taking the bandwidth away from those distressed souls trying to rent vans in Reading…

  3. Brian Peers says:

    Out of interest has anyone ever been asked for their counterpart travelling overseas?

    • Deenesh says:

      I’ve always just handed mine over but know many people who have never been asked. You are right, this “problem” has been blown up by the media.

  4. So what happens to drivers from Germany, Switzerland, France, … (add European country) … , California … (add 49 states) … . etc? Do/did they also have absurd counterpart sheets? Of course not.

    GB has EU-format licences which are recognised internationally. US states have no common format AFAIK, yet they are recognised internationlly.

    +1 to the suggestion that this is one got up by the media. Must be slow news days.

    +1 to the suggestions that the counterparts or codes are not required in practice.

  5. I had received an email from hertz gold reward warning me of the changes.

  6. what are these comments for at this article?