The alternative to hotel loyalty schemes – Hotels.com and Hotels.com Rewards

Today I want to review Hotels.com Rewards, previously known as Welcome Rewards, the loyalty programme for Hotels.com.

I have spent the last two weeks analysing the ‘big seven’ hotel loyalty programmes (all of the links are on this page).  Each of them offers a different mix of status benefits, points earning and points redeeming features. Which is the best for you is very dependant on where and how you stay and where and how you redeem.

There is another option, though.

A lot of people end up, by choice or by default, splitting their stays across a number of different chains. They do a lot of nights, but never enough to build up status or a decent number of points.

For these people, Hotels.com Rewards from Hotels.com is a better way to go.

Hotels com Rewards Review

Hotels.com (which is actually owned by Expedia) will be familiar to most readers. It is a huge hotel booking portal covering pretty much every corner of the planet.

You won’t find hotels.com much cheaper than booking a hotel directly. When a property is part of a bigger chain with a ‘Best Rate Guarantee’, you can be certain it won’t be cheaper. However, the majority of the properties on the site count for ‘Hotels.com Rewards’ (285,000 hotels, which is about 10 times more than all of the ‘big seven’ loyalty schemes combined!)

Hotels.com Rewards (their home page is here) – previously known as Welcome Rewards – is an idiot-proof loyalty scheme:

You earn 1 point for every night you book, whatever the chain

When you have got 10 points, you get a free night

The value of the free night is the average price you paid for those 10 nights

Your points don’t expire as long as you have one stay every 12 months

There aren’t any catches when you redeem.  You can pick any property on Hotels.com that takes part in Hotels.com Rewards (ie most of them) and you can pay the difference if you want to book a hotel which is more expensive than the value of your free night voucher.

There is a lot of upside here:

ALL of your stays (assuming the hotels you book are in Hotels.com Rewards and most are) will count towards free nights. No more ‘wasted’ stays.

Your free night can be used to book any room on hotels.com. Most reward schemes restrict the ability to book club rooms, suites, family room etc. That is not a problem with Hotels.com Rewards.

When travelling, you are free to stay at the hotel which is most convenient for where you need to be – no need to mess around with badly reviewed properties or out of the way hotels purely to find one in your favourite chain.

What is the snag?

Well, the main one is that you will not earn points with the hotel itself.  

The big chains have clamped down in the last couple of years and most will not now let you have your normal elite benefits either.  And, in any event, you would soon lose all of your hotel status cards if you shifted all of your spending to hotels.com.  You will probably also fail to earn points for any food and drink spending in the hotel

(Hotels.com Rewards does have its own status programme, of sorts. Do 10 nights in a year and you become a Silver member albeit with no hard benefits. Do 30 nights and you become Gold which promises access to ‘exclusive deals’).

For a lot of travellers, it is also impractical. If you have a company travel agent, it is unlikely that you will be allowed to book via Hotels.com. You would need to be self-employed or working for a company which gives you a lot of flexibility in making your own travel arrangements.

The key point to take away from my review of Hotels.com Rewards, however, is that you should have a serious think about whether you would be better off taking their free nights instead of collecting points in specific hotel schemes.

(Want to earn more hotel points?  Click here to see our complete list of promotions from the major hotel chains or use the ‘Hotel Promos’ link in the menu bar at the top of the page.)

Bits: 2400 Avios with £99 tablet, Norwegian adds Singapore, more Amex Plat lounges
Bits: TAP launches London City, generous SAS / Hertz deal, KLM drops free bags for BlueBiz
About Head for Points

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Comments

  1. I wasn’t aware of putting a link in but maybe it treats the dotcom reference as a link automatically? I also wasn’t aware that T C B was considered dodgy/banned …. I obviously need to get more with it!

  2. I’m a few nights short of enough for gold but the extra benefits seem somewhat vague. What “special deals” have you had since you got gold?

  3. Would be interesting to see a poll of your readers to see what schemes they prefer

    For me I love hotels.com for above reasons + much clearer pricing than hotels own websites

    Also as a Gold member, customer service will sometimes cancel non-refundable bookings

  4. 2bad4ya says:

    they can/might allow you to cancel non-refundable stays

  5. You sound fun.

  6. The vibe I’ve always gotten from the business advice on this site is “take advantage of HMRC/your company as much as you can get away with” (not a criticism as such considering I’d do the same, though slightly morally dubious!). Earning kick backs from company expenses is par for the course!

  7. Renwaldo says:

    Absolutely spot on Rob

  8. There’s a difference (to me at least) between doing something potentially morally wrong but within the rules vs knowingly doing something that breaks the law but with a low chance of being caught!

  9. As long as you hit the status by the date, you’ll get that status for the remainder of this reward year, plus all of the next 12 months too. Then to maintain Gold you’ll need an additional 30 nights in the 12mo period from renewal date.

  10. …So i don’t buy the assertion that hotels.com is the most generous scheme. Most convenient – agreed. But given Rob’s dislike of fixed value rewards, e.g. Nectar and Accor, I’m surprised he doesn’t mention the lack of arbitrage as a drawback here.

  11. True, but I’d put that as secondary behind loss of status benefits. This is a decent scheme for people who can’t be bothered with hotel schemes, I think.