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Reasonable to leave teens in economy

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  • blueskiesahead

    Is it reasonable to book well behaved , well travelled 15 and 17 year old in economy while we ,the parents, sit in club?
    Short haul only.
    I cannot justify all of us in Club on my journey to silver !
    Many thanks for your opinions and experiences

    Blair Waldorf Salad

    I know someone whose sleeping teen was molested on a long haul flight (Federal officials involved when the flight landed – all very shocking) so instinctively I say no but aware it’s based on a single criminal example.

    lollyfry

    You could maybe to 1 x adult and 1 x teen in each class instead if you’re concerned?

    TooPoorToBeHere

    When I was 12 I was put onto Intercity trains without a parent and trusted to get off at the correct station.

    My wife’s divorced friend has been putting her daughter onto BA flights to visit her father, unattended, since a similar age.

    I wouldn’t hesitate.

    PeteM

    Can’t see what the problem is – “the minimum age of a person permitted to travel alone on British Airways is 14 years of age”.

    Froggee

    I’d totally say yes – particularly given you have well behaved kids. It’s short haul so you’ll probably still be able to see them anyway. If you sat them next to you they’d probably put headphones on and ignore you and it isn’t like they are going to get value for the fare in champagne consumption.

    Rob
    HfP Staff

    15 and 17? No brainer. Would be a no brainer for me with our 11 and 14 year olds to be honest – they were booked into WTP to Mauritius in May until 2 extra seats opened up.

    The Savage Squirrel

    I’d say yes, no problem. Used to get the bus and coach cross-country without adults at a far younger age.

    Re: the criminal activity above: any instance is shocking, but given your indentity is known and you can’t leave the scene on a plane (as the perpetrator found), I’d say such behaviour is far far LESS likely to occurr here than in most other public places. Unless you literally never let your 15-17 out in public without you, then this should not be a concern.

    Tracey

    At that age it would be far safer to leave in economy than home alone!

    Richie

    What are you going to order from the Speedbird cafe for the teens?

    NorthernLass

    Yes – on our BOS trip in March OH and I were in F and 16 year old sat in CW – I had to get him an avios seat at the last minute and the cash price was about £8000!
    He was fine, the only person concerned was a flight attendant who popped over to tell me she was worried because he didn’t seem very hungry!
    We’re doing the same at Xmas to IAD, in fact I considered putting him in WTP but I wouldn’t want him to be further away than the next cabin, really. It would be a lot cheaper though …

    I also used to fly to Spain alone every summer in my teens to see my family, including getting the overnight coach to London! I think we were less coddled in those days lol.

    BJ

    Might just be me but so far I don’t think anybody has answered the question the OP might actually be asking 🙂

    billy ten

    Several people have answered the question/ question about reasonableness. The kids are actually young adults – 15 & 17. Of course the OP/ parent can dump them in cattle class & travel in more luxury – the kids should be happy to get a holiday for free. My parents never took me abroad though I did get to go on a school trip to France and another 3 week exchange also to France. Grandparents paid for a 2 week ski holiday with school, when my elder brother 16YO got P!ssed and broke his bedroom sink, nearly got us all sent back early. I was a very good skier.

    Point being – those young adults should just be grateful to be flying at all, as opposed to getting sent to stay with some miserable relative whilst parents go on their jollies.

    We have taken our 3 kids abroad to all sorts of places – mostly Europe but also LH – I wouldn’t dump a 5YO in cattle when I went Business – but FFS 15YO and 17YO – when I was frickin 17YO I went round Europe on my own for a month.

    memesweeper

    I’d be happy to do this — but I would advise that you do not unless

    – you are happy that they can fly alone… they will be on their own PNR so in the event of a problem you could be re-routed on different flights
    – you brief them that in the event of an emergency they follow crew instructions and get off immediately without you
    – you know you will be able to resist the temptation to rush back to find your younglings in the event of an emergency?
    – you are happy they will not feel the need to pop up to Club and see you during the flight (this is frowned upon and the crew are entitled to just say no)

    I’ve been in a different cabin to my kids only once, and although seats were confirmed before the flight and fairly close together, it was possible that would be on different floors, never mind in different cabins. Our scheduled plane went tech so there was a real risk of re-routing too (this didn’t actually happen, we all ended up on the same replacement flight). The teens were told quite clearly they would not see us after boarding until we were all off and up the airbridges after landing, and in the event of emergency, look after each other, don’t wait for mum and dad.

    One way to slightly de-risk this is put adult + kid on one PNR in club and adult + kid(s) on another in economy. Swap seats after everyone has boarded (with the permission of the crew). At least that way you can’t end up on different planes.

    John

    It’s short-haul, there’s basically no difference between the classes. If the flight is not full (and more likely if someone has status) the kids might even have the middle seat free.

    When I was 10 we had irrops in the US and I was put in the middle seat between two strangers, my dad got to sit in F and my mum was also between two strangers somewhere else. It was a UA flight. Hmm, but this was before 9/11 so dunno if anything would have changed later

    NigelHamilton

    Although I can see I’m in the minority here, personally I think it’s unconscionable as a parent to make the kids sit in a lower class while you enjoy club. I’d book the club ticket in my name for the tier points, then give one of the kids my club seat and sit in economy.

    kevind

    Peter and Kate McCallister flew to Paris in First whilst the kids were “back in coach” sans Kevin!

    davefl

    PMSL at this thread. Yes as long as they understand what “airplane mode” is on their phone.

    Like they’re going to care…and they’ll probably be better behaved than the adults.

    Honestly, it depends if they’re good kids or utter brats like some are.

    Amy C

    Although I can see I’m in the minority here, personally I think it’s unconscionable as a parent to make the kids sit in a lower class while you enjoy club. I’d book the club ticket in my name for the tier points, then give one of the kids my club seat and sit in economy.

    I’m speechless. Why?

    BJ

    Although I can see I’m in the minority here, personally I think it’s unconscionable as a parent to make the kids sit in a lower class while you enjoy club. I’d book the club ticket in my name for the tier points, then give one of the kids my club seat and sit in economy.

    I’m speechless. Why?

    …and admittedly I’m probably being a bit dense here, but that was an answer to the question I thought the OP was really asking 🙂

    CarpalTravel

    Although I can see I’m in the minority here, personally I think it’s unconscionable as a parent to make the kids sit in a lower class while you enjoy club. I’d book the club ticket in my name for the tier points, then give one of the kids my club seat and sit in economy.

    So only one of the children is allowed up in club? Yes, that definitely seems much better and far less unconscionable… 🙄

    Years ago my parents flew in a higher class whilst my sister and I sat at the back. Didn’t bother us in the slightest, I was on holiday and frankly, enjoyed the taste of independence.15 and 17yrs, jeez. How is this even a discussion?

    NigelHamilton

    Although I can see I’m in the minority here, personally I think it’s unconscionable as a parent to make the kids sit in a lower class while you enjoy club. I’d book the club ticket in my name for the tier points, then give one of the kids my club seat and sit in economy.

    So only one of the children is allowed up in club? Yes, that definitely seems much better and far less unconscionable… 🙄

    Years ago my parents flew in a higher class whilst my sister and I sat at the back. Didn’t bother us in the slightest, I was on holiday and frankly, enjoyed the taste of independence.15 and 17yrs, jeez. How is this even a discussion?

    Everyone does parenting differently, which is the point of debate. For me, I would rather give something up myself if it means giving it to someone else. Be interested to know how many people would take a class upgrade if it was only offered to them and not their partner – I suspect there’s plenty that would! I’d end up divorced before the start of the flight 😂


    @carpaltravel
    . There are two club legs and two children…..

    In terms of safety, I used to travel ‘solo’ from the age of 13 on long distance trains, and planes from 15. If you’re on the same plane, it shouldn’t be an issue, though you might want to ensure youre comfortable with who they’re sat with.

    yonasl

    At that age your kids want to sit as far away from mum and you as they can. No matter how much they may love you and get along with you.

    BJ

    Now we’re getting there I think. The way I read the OP the family usually fly together in same class but this time because OP is chasing status he is considering splitting them between classes. I read that decision was troubling him as he uses words like reasonable and justified. The comments about behaviour I think are just the OP stressing he trusts and has confidence in his kids to sit separately without need for supervision. There was no mention of safety or other concerns. It is well known that groups, even family groups, do not always get to sit together even within one class anyway.

    So, if I read it right then I think the OP will find the only answer he needs by talking to his family not HFP forum. Suspect the answer is most likely in line with @CarpalTravel. Two thoughts: does the BAH double TP offer provide opportunity to get the TP required, allow the family to sit together, and reduce total costs compared to flights only? If not, could OP alone fly CE and the other parent sit with two kids across a row of three, possibly could pay for seat selection and get front row of Y immediately behind OP in last row of CE?

    blueskiesahead

    Excellent replies with pros and cons. I had not thought of some of the negatives and may indeed switch to one adult one child in economy . Many thanks

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