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Forums Frequent flyer programs British Airways Executive Club Seeing seat selection costs

  • Alwaysbusy 9 posts

    About to make a redemption booking LHR to SFO in CW for next year with my wife – there is availability. Want to book the earlier of the two flights because it’s an A380 and I want us to be in the honeymoon centre seats. Am currently Silver but will be have dropped to Bronze by the time I book.

    To see costs for seat selection I did a dummy cash booking (without logging in with my BAEC number). This came back with “seat selection free”. At first, I thought it had picked up on a cookie indicating my Silver status, so I cleared my cookies and tried again. Same result!

    As far as I am aware, I will have to pay for seat selection (unless, as Bronze, I wait until T-7). So, how do I see what seat selection costs will really be?

    NorthernLass 7,985 posts

    If you’re currently booking as Silver then seat selection will come up as free for you, regardless of what you’ll be when you eventually book/fly. Is there someone else who can try a dummy cash booking for you?

    Budget for around £100 per seat, per leg though!

    AndrewT 90 posts

    I suspect you just need to explicitly log out of your BA account. By default it keeps you logged in, closing the browser window alone does not log you out.

    If by implication both legs are currently available why can’t you book them before you lose Silver? If you’re short of avios is buying avios a better option than paying for seats?

    Not Long Now... 95 posts

    Personally I wouldn’t worry. Book now as silver and reserve the pair you want, but the “honeymoon” seats are usually the last to get reserved, because other than your loving selves, most couples seem to want a window pair or an aisle + 1 pair to avoid the ‘climbover’, and singles don’t usually want to become honeymooners on a first flight…. If BA move you later I’d bet you’ll be able to swap when on board, plus the plane may change anyway.

    AndrewT 90 posts

    A random date later in the year shows the center seats on the lower deck at £96 a pop, so @northenlass was pretty close.

    Alwaysbusy 9 posts

    Many thanks for all the advice.

    @Not Long Now. I was under the impression that the “honeymoon” seats were the preferred option for those travelling as a couple (at least for couples who wish to talk to each other during the flight!). Will do some further research on the benefits of the “window pair” option.

    NorthernLass 7,985 posts

    It can be a nice option for a longish flight because you can spread into each other’s space to a certain extent, but you’ll most likely have a stranger on each side which can be a bit awkward. On our last flight in old CW, to DXB on the A380 my desire to travel in the front row window seat on the upper deck overrode any affection for my OH, I have to admit 😂. Those are awesome seats, like having a little private cabin to yourself.

    Richie 1,018 posts

    There are no CW ‘honeymoon’ pairs on the upper deck of the A380 since the seating is 2-3-2.

    NorthernLass 7,985 posts

    OP didn’t mention the upper deck, but that was the main attraction for me as I’d never sat there before.

    Deek 52 posts

    On our last flight in old CW, to DXB on the A380 my desire to travel in the front row window seat on the upper deck overrode any affection for my OH, I have to admit 😂. Those are awesome seats, like having a little private cabin to yourself.

    This probably runs against the grain but I prefer those CW bulkhead window seats on the upper deck A380 (53/59) to the new CS! Last flight the divider went up 2 mins after takeoff and they weren’t lowered for landing.

    NorthernLass 7,985 posts

    I agree, I think it’s the best CW space I’ve ever travelled in! (Which is fortunate as we were sat on board for 4 hours before we actually took off!)

    JDB 4,536 posts

    I agree, I think it’s the best CW space I’ve ever travelled in! (Which is fortunate as we were sat on board for 4 hours before we actually took off!)

    I noticed that Rishi used a grammatically incorrect colloquialism like “we were sat” recently. Hopefully his usage will make such language as uncool and undesirable as the trainers he displayed recently.

    Lady London 2,117 posts

    It’s Yorkshire dialect JDB. Can’t speak for the trainers though.

    NorthernLass 7,985 posts

    Are you struggling to find things to carp at today, @JDB?!

    It’s common usage in the north and is held by some to be grammatically correct, as the past participle “sitting” denotes continuous movement, which was markedly absent on this occasion. As one would say in French, “je suis assise” in similar circumstances and not je m’assois”.

    Trainers should only be worn when taking part in sport or exercise though, you are quite right there.

    JDB 4,536 posts

    It’s Yorkshire dialect JDB. Can’t speak for the trainers though.

    Nice excuse, but it’s not any sort of dialect but simply incorrect grammar that has crept in the language in the UK but seemingly not in the US. It’s incorrect on a number of bases, but for starters try substituting other verbs for ‘sat’ to see how ridiculous it is – e.g. ‘we were talked for four hours’ or ‘we were ran for four hours’.

    It’s unfortunate that educated foreigners now seem to speak better English than many native speakers and that the children of people who immigrated here as adults value education more than others so also speak better.

    NorthernLass 7,985 posts

    For the sake of your blood pressure I hope you don’t read too much on here then, @JDB, especially some of the recent HFP articles.

    I’m sure billionaire Rishi Sunak is utterly mortified now and making haste to book some English lessons and replace his footwear 😂

    Misty 258 posts

    I agree, I think it’s the best CW space I’ve ever travelled in! (Which is fortunate as we were sat on board for 4 hours before we actually took off!)

    I noticed that Rishi used a grammatically incorrect colloquialism like “we were sat” recently. Hopefully his usage will make such language as uncool and undesirable as the trainers he displayed recently.

    Gosh, and I thought he went to Winchester and Oxford.

    JDB 4,536 posts

    Are you struggling to find things to carp at today, @JDB?!

    As one would say in French, “je suis assise” in similar circumstances and not je m’assois”.

    I think you meant ‘j’étais assise’ which aligns with the correct English ‘we were sitting’. The act of sitting was continuous, even if the aircraft didn’t move.

    NorthernLass 7,985 posts

    Clearly they let anyone in these days, @Misty 😂

    But if you look into the historical usage of the word “sat”, it is recorded as being used in this way; like many terms it fell out of favour in some circles and was retained in others. Hence you have examples in American English of words which were common hundreds of years ago but are rarely heard on the streets of modern Britain, “gotten” being a notable example.


    @JDB
    , in that case I think you mean “nous étions assis”. But the act of sitting is lowering one’s posterior onto the seat, surely? If you’re going to take it to the nth degree, the only acceptable term would be “we were seated”.

    The OP must be finding this so helpful, not only do they now know where to sit and how much it will cost, they will be able to refer to their position correctly.

    runnerbean 57 posts

    Less than 12 posts so far on non grammar topic…😆

    NorthernLass 7,985 posts

    Omg you’ve done it now @runnerbean. I think you’ll find that should be “fewer” 😂😂😂

    Lady London 2,117 posts

    It’s Yorkshire dialect JDB. Can’t speak for the trainers though.

    Nice excuse, but it’s not any sort of dialect but simply incorrect grammar that has crept in the language in the UK but seemingly not in the US. It’s incorrect on a number of bases, but for starters try substituting other verbs for ‘sat’ to see how ridiculous it is – e.g. ‘we were talked for four hours’ or ‘we were ran for four hours’.

    It’s unfortunate that educated foreigners now seem to speak better English than many native speakers and that the children of people who immigrated here as adults value education more than others so also speak better.

    Linguistically though I have always thought ‘sat’ in this usage was an adjective not a verb. So we were in the state of being sat, kind of.

    Same as on the j’étais assis(e) you mention. Assis(e) here is an adjective not a verb.

    runnerbean 57 posts

    @ NorthernLass, I wondered who would be first to bite!
    Try going into any non- Waitrose supermarket with my OH.

    Ihar 158 posts

    I don’t care about anyone’s dialect, but the improper use (or absence) of the Oxford comma drive me insane. If you’re going to “Turn left” at least have good punctuation! 😀

    Seriously though, it is crazy bad marketing to charge for CW seats. It leaves a bad taste in the mouth

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