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  • geekay 12 posts

    Hope someone can help.

    I have a booking with Vueling from Spain back to Gatwick in October.

    I received an email today saying that the flight number had changed, and asking me to check back in etc.

    The time of the flight has moved by 10 minutes, and there is indeed a new flight number.

    As far as I understand it, a new flight number means that my original flight has been cancelled and I have the right to ask for a refund – which is helpful, as I was likely going to have to cancel the trip and the ticket was non-refundable. Vueling customer services said that the original flight had been cancelled but because the new flight was “the same time” that I had to accept it. They then decided that the original flight had not been cancelled. I think they were confused that I wanted to cancel because, correctly, they pointed out that the new flight was essentially the same as the previous flight.

    I think they are incorrect, but before I get into a fight with them, would appreciate if someone could confirm if I am right, and that I am entitled to a refund.

    On top of this, does anyone have an email that can be used to message them? I don’t want to have to speak to someone on the phone, and their webform only allows a claim for 1 person per booking – we are a family of 5, and when I put in my wife’s details it then asked me for my legal power of attorney. It is almost as though someone had designed the refund process to be as complex as possible……!

    Thank you.

    JDB 4,849 posts

    @geekay – there is a precise definition of a cancellation that would entitle you to a refund or reroute.

    3.2. Cancellation
    3.2.1. Definition of cancellation
    Article 2(l) of the Regulation defines ‘cancellation’ as the non-operation of a flight which was previously planned and on
    which at least one place was reserved.
    Cancellation occurs in principle where the planning of the original flight is abandoned and passengers of that flight join
    passengers on a flight which was also planned, but independently of the original flight. Article 2(l) does not require an
    express decision of cancellation by the carrier.

    So, if in your case Vueling has moved the time by a few minutes and changed the flight number but moved all the passengers from the original flight onto this one, that’s not a cancellation.

    ChrisBCN 294 posts

    There’s the other complication with Vueling which is that they will never give you anything you are entitled too, ever. You would be on for a hell of a fight, even if legally you are in the right.

    NorthernLass 8,482 posts

    Avoid getting tangled up in Spanish bureaucracy if you value your sanity. You’ll probably find you need to submit your grandparents’ birth certificates or similar by the end of the process!

    ChrisBCN 294 posts

    Avoid getting tangled up in Spanish bureaucracy if you value your sanity. You’ll probably find you need to submit your grandparents’ birth certificates or similar by the end of the process!

    That’s a very outdated view! It will obviously depend on what you need to do and which state/entity is involved, but pretty much everything is digital and easy to perform.

    You will of course find exceptions, but they are few and far between.

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