The result of the BA pilots vote on industrial action is not looking good ….

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A quick extra article today to share this bit of news.

There is currently a wave of industrial unrest brewing at British Airways.  This is being driven by the strong financial performance of the business, which is not being reflected in pay or bonuses.

A number of votes are underway across the various unions involved.  BALPA, the British Airline Pilots Association, has just released the results of its ballot and it is not pretty:

Balpa supporting industrial action

Question 1:

Do you accept BA’s revised pay offer?

Yes – 1%

No – 99%

Question 2:

If we cannot secure an acceptable offer through negotation, do you wish BALPA to conduct an official ballot for industrial action, including strike action?

Yes – 96%

No – 4%

Turnout was 89% which is very high as these things go.

According to the last set of figures I could find, BALPA represents about 90% of BA pilots so any industrial action will effectively ground the airline.

British Airways put out this statement in response:

We continue open discussions with our trade unions. Our pay proposal is fair, reasonable and reflects typical pay awards given by other companies in the UK.

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Comments

  1. What about engineering, ground staff and other departments.. this is bigger than pilots..

    The company is not looking after its staff!!!!

    • Pilots are more of a crunch issue. Cabin crew are split across various unions and, with judicious scheduling and paying overtime to get people right to the edge of their legal hours, BA can minimise the impact of a strike. It has done this before.

      If 90% of your pilots walk out, you’re stuffed. You also need to remember the complications of scheduling – even if a pilot who is not on strike takes a long-haul aircraft outbound, he can’t fly it back for a couple of days so you also need non-striking crew downroute.

  2. Amex Travel ought to copy Bremont’s offer next 🙂

  3. BillyTheKid says:

    How long until the BBC blames the potential strike on Brexit ?

  4. Michael says:

    I have a genuine question here – although basic salary for mixed fleet is something like 12-14k a year, do they actually gross that amount, or does something else like flying pay come into it? I read somewhere the actual gross wage is like £22k a year with everything thrown in.

    But I think Industrial action is needed at BA, I have friends who have just quit – the same problems are being faced in engineering that are being faced with Cabin crew and pilots. Poor pay and bonuses, crap working conditions and managers who simply don’t care (or so i’m told). I’m also told there’s people with 20+ years experience with BA quitting to work on the railways.

    • There is dispute between BA and the unions over what the average total pay is. £22k is still totally rubbish, of course, given that you’re going to be living near London and working very anti-social hours including weekends etc.

      • Michael says:

        I was going to say 22k isn’t too bad in the regions but not brilliant. Living in london however, that’s going to hit you very very hard if you’re not living with parents.

        • Looking forward to someone who doesn’t live in the real world saying “if they don’t like it they should get another job” as if it’s always that simple for everyone

  5. It’s the cabin crew that should get a massive pay rise

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