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British Airways launches its Winter flight sale – what is worth a look?

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British Airways has launched its January sale, a few days earlier than usual.

We will admit that it isn’t the most exciting sale ever. Whilst you can normally get some good deals in the BA Boxing Day sales the fares, as they currently stand, are unenticing. Transatlantic flights are virtually undiscounted, although other destinations are better.

You can see all deals available on the sale section of ba.com here.

You need to book by 25th January.

Business class: British Airways Club World sale deals

Crunching the numbers on this sale shows that you will find the better deals on flights to Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and Africa.

We’ve been tracking BA sale fares for a while now. Flights to North America are the most expensive they’ve been for the past two years. Flights to India are comparatively good value this year. Here is some typical sale pricing:

  • Rio de Janeiro from £1,548
  • Sao Paulo from £1,543
  • Bengaluru from £1,999
  • Hyderabad from £1,999
  • Delhi from £1,599
  • Tel Aviv from £955
  • Hong Kong from £1,781

How to check pricing

The easiest way to check for the lowest fares on any particular route, or across a series of routes, is via the British Airways Low Fare Finder – click here.

This is one of the most useful pages of the BA website. I find it especially helpful when looking for cheap Club Europe short haul business class deals to top up my tier points.

You can quickly see, for example, that New York gets no cheaper than £1,648, Boston no cheaper than £1,710 etc. An aggressive British Airways sale would see those cities at around the £1,200 mark. £1,962 to Miami is hardly a bargain either.

British Airways launches a new sale

‘Book with Confidence’ is still running

Remember that, under the British Airways ‘Book With Confidence’ guarantee, you can cancel your flight at any time, for any reason, for a British Airways ‘Future Travel Voucher’

This applies to bookings for travel by 31st August 2022.  The voucher must be used for a flight which is taken by 30th September 2023.

If your flight is cancelled by British Airways for any reason, you will receive a full cash refund.

British Airways Holidays has discounted holidays and city breaks

British Airways Holidays has also got in on the act with a selection of ‘flight and hotel’ and ‘flight and car’ packages.

The key thing to know about British Airways Holidays is that booking a flight and hotel, or flight and car hire, together can offer better value than booking each element separately.

These are the ‘lead in’ deals in the current sale.  There are lots of other options available which you can see if you look here.

Club World (business class) flight and hotel deals

  • Barbados – seven nights at the 4* South Beach Resort breakfast included from £2,020 pp
  • St Lucia – seven nights at the 4* Bay Gardens Beach Resort & Spa from £1,929 pp
  • Bahamas – seven nights at the 4* British Colonial Hilton Nassau from £2,177 pp
  • San Francisco – five nights at the 4* Riu Plaza Fisherman’s Wharf from £2,058 pp including breakfast
  • Dubai – seven nights at the 5* Ajman Sarai (Marriott Luxury Collection) from £1,572 pp including breakfast
  • Whistler – five nights at the 4* Pan Pacific Whistler Mountainside from £2,078 pp

Booking a British Airways Holidays package also gives you additional protection in case there are any issues with your flights or hotel, due to the strong legally-binding ATOL scheme.

Under the British Airways Holidays coronavirus guarantee, if you book a holiday for travel up to 31st August 2022, you can amend your booking for free (just pay the difference in price) or cancel it and get a voucher for travel up until September 2023.

British Airways launches a new sale

Double tier points is extended

BA Holidays has also extended its ‘double tier points’ offer until October 2022. We have covered this, and other current BA Holidays offers and benefits, in a separate article today.

How to pay for your British Airways sale booking

To maximise your miles when paying, your best bet is the British Airways American Express Premium Plus card which earns double Avios (3 per £1) when you book at ba.com or via BA Holidays

You do not get double Avios if you book with the free British Airways American Express card

Another option is American Express Preferred Rewards Gold which offers double points – 2 per £1 – when you book directly with an airline.

Conclusion

The British Airways sale home page is here where you can find out more and get your head around what is available. 

Remember that you need to book by midnight on 25th January.


HFP-Barclaycard-Avios-Card

How to earn Avios from UK credit cards (November 2022)

As a reminder, there are various ways of earning Avios points from UK credit cards.  Many cards also have generous sign-up bonuses!

In February 2022, Barclaycard launched two exciting new Barclaycard Avios Mastercard cards with a bonus of up to 25,000 Avios. You can apply here.

You qualify for the bonus on these cards even if you have a British Airways American Express card:

Barclaycard Avios Plus card

Barclaycard Avios Plus Mastercard

25,000 Avios for signing up and an upgrade voucher for spending £10,000 Read our full review

Barclaycard Avios card

Barclaycard Avios Mastercard

5,000 Avios for signing up and an upgrade voucher for spending £20,000 Read our full review

There are two official British Airways American Express cards with attractive sign-up bonuses:

British Airways American Express Premium Plus

25,000 Avios and the UK’s most valuable card perk – the 2-4-1 voucher Read our full review

British Airways American Express

5,000 Avios for signing up and an Economy 2-4-1 voucher for spending £12,000 Read our full review

You can also get generous sign-up bonuses by applying for American Express cards which earn Membership Rewards points.

American Express Preferred Rewards Gold

Your best beginner’s card – 20,000 points, FREE for a year & four airport lounge passes Read our full review

The Platinum Card from American Express

30,000 points and unbeatable travel benefits – for a fee Read our full review

Run your own business?

We recommend Capital On Tap for limited companies. You earn 1 Avios per £1 which is impressive for a Visa card, along with a sign-up bonus worth 10,000 Avios.

Capital On Tap Business Rewards Visa

10,500 points bonus – the most generous Avios Visa for a limited company Read our full review

You should also consider the British Airways Accelerating Business credit card. This is open to sole traders as well as limited companies and has a 30,000 Avios sign-up bonus.

British Airways Accelerating Business American Express

30,000 Avios sign-up bonus – plus annual bonuses of up to 30,000 Avios Read our full review

There are also generous bonuses on the two American Express Business cards, with the points converting at 1:1 into Avios. These cards are open to sole traders as well as limited companies.

American Express Business Platinum

40,000 points sign-up bonus and a £200 Amex Travel credit every year Read our full review

American Express Business Gold

20,000 points sign-up bonus and free for a year Read our full review

Click here to read our detailed summary of all UK credit cards which earn Avios. This includes both personal and small business cards.

Comments (29)

This article is closed to new comments. Feel free to ask your question in the HfP forums.

  • Dev says:

    Nothing spectacular here. Even Delhi, which apart from BOM/BOS/DXB/JFK, I find to be one of the cheapest proper long haul is £1.6K which is very meh. A sale price would see it drop to around £1.2K – £1.4K.

    However, Sao Paulo and Rio are actually cheapish.

  • Nick H says:

    Anyone seen any decent offers on upgrade from Non- to Premium Plus BA card? I have essentially triggered the spend, but could hang on to see if an upgrade offer (x,000 bonus avios) turns up?

  • Lady London says:

    Interesting that Transatlantic fares seem close to 2x the fares that were findable in the past two years.

    BA only has cartel-type protection on those routes, right? Due to being signed up together with its natural competitors to the “Transatlantic Agreenent”.

    Though I can’t blame BA for protecting its pricing on the routes where it makes a large percentage of its money. Also in these times, it needs to keep prices high on North American routes due to the continuing impact on travel due to Covid in their other geographies.

    Note though that what’s on offer does change during the sale period.

    • Rob says:

      It’s not so much that it’s cartel pricing, its that all the money goes into a big pot and then AA, IB, BA and Finnair divvy it up via an unknown formula. You can argue whether or not this structure incentivises BA to sell seats cheaply or not, given that it doesn’t see the bulk of your cash.

      • Alex Sm says:

        Has anyone got anywhere close to knowing what this magic formula is? Any informed speculative guesses from you, Rob?

        • Rob says:

          Absolutely no idea …

          • Nick says:

            Trust me, it’s no less complicated even if you do know it.

            In reality though the important thing to note is that it’s enough to make BA (and the others) genuinely ‘metal neutral’ everywhere. All internal and external targets apply to the JB as a whole, pricing is managed by region for all flights together, and no one at all is bothered whether a customer flies AA or BA. Most ‘real’ customers choose by schedule anyway.

            Whether the arrangement is a good thing overall is not an easy call to make. For example, it is completely true that some direct routes only exist because of the JB. AA sold customers make up half the pax load on some BA routes and those flights wouldn’t exist without the partnership.

            Merry Christmas.

      • CH says:

        Iirc, BA coordinates transatlantic fares as well with the other members of the JV, and a similar arrangement exists for the other transatlantic JVs. The net effect is to reduce competition, which to my mind is cartel-like behaviour. While the airlines would argue that it facilitates more efficient allocation of capacity, from a consumer perspective it reduces choice. On certain routes there are enough options and low enough barriers to entry that the impact on fares may be small,

  • botham says:

    I am awaiting doubling up of my 540 TP’s, which will put me on the brink of another milestone. Heady days indeed.

  • WaynedP says:

    If you go to BA’s low fare finder (which Rob references and links in the article) and you select a different duration to the default 7 nights (and hit the blue “Find lowest price” button to refresh the page), you can get a feel for the extent of the discount offered in the sale price for some (not all) destinations. Underwhelming, as Rob has already pointed out.

  • Jitesh says:

    Obviously travel wasn’t really a thing last year, but I saw DEL for 1.2k in J last year

This article is closed to new comments. Feel free to ask your question in the HfP forums.

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