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British Airways launches flights to Aruba and Georgetown

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British Airways has been filing its schedules for 2023 this week, and as part of that it has launched a number of new routes.

Ski flights from Gatwick (click to read) have relaunched, as have a number of new flights from Gatwick and Heathrow to the Caribbean (click to read). Both had wide open Avios availability, although going by the comments on both articles a lot of that has been snapped up by readers.

British Airways will also add two more Caribbean routes from Gatwick: Aruba and Georgetown, Guyana. As these are new flights Avios availability should be wide open, with four seats in Club, two in World Traveller Plus (premium economy) and eight in World Traveller (economy) available.

British Airways launches flights to Aruba and Georgetown

London Gatwick – Aruba

The new Aruba flights will operate from Gatwick. There will be two flights per week on Thursday and Sunday, starting from the last week of March.

The flight leaves London at 10:00, arriving in Aruba at 16:30 by way of Antigua, where it has a brief 1-hour stop.

On the return, flights will depart Aruba at 18:30 and arrive in Gatwick at 10:15 the following morning, again via a quick 1-hour stopover in Antigua.

London Gatwick – Georgetown (Guyana)

The Georgetown flights will operate as a one-stop service via St Lucia.

There will be two flights per week on Monday and Thursday, starting in the last week of March.

The outbound service departs Gatwick at 11:35 and arrives in Georgetown at 18:05. The stop-over is scheduled for an hour.

On the return, the flight departs Georgetown at 19:50 and lands at Gatwick at 11:45 the following morning, again via St Lucia.


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Comments (38)

This article is closed to new comments. Feel free to ask your question in the HfP forums.

  • Maria J says:

    Good morning! Thank you very much for the warning. Managed to get flights to Aruba. Very happy 🙂

  • Graeme says:

    We have been to Aruba several times. Basically Vegas on the beach for the yanks. Hotel prices, like everywhere now, are eye watering. Would recommend Bucuti or Manchebo on Eagle beach, avoid the hotel strip of Palm Beach. Beautiful turquoise waters but all of the Caribbean has that. Again for us Scots, can connect outbound from GLA but trek into London on the return, not ideal!

  • Dave says:

    Curious that BA thinks that Guyana has moved from South America (where it actually is) to the Caribbean. If BA does not know where Guyana is located, how can it fly there?

    • Callum says:

      The terms Caribbean and South America are not mutually exclusive. Numerous places – including Guyana – are considered to be in both…

      In fact, the main English-speaking Caribbean governmental organisation – CARICOM – is headquartered in Guyana…

    • Brian78 says:

      “If BA does not know where Guyana is located, how can it fly there?”

      Because presumably the pilots do know where it is

    • blenz101 says:

      Are you worried about them flying back to Heathrow which is on the British Isles, in the North Sea and also in Europe?

    • VerdantBacon says:

      Despite what you might think, the British are no longer in charge of deciding where Guyana is

  • callum says:

    The Virgin conversion offers specifically states (three times) that you will not get the bonus if you have auto-converted before – regardless of whether you have had a previous bonus or not.

  • barry cutters says:

    Guyana seems a bit strange for me .

    Is there really enough demand for this . Been looking this morning at what’s to see/do – looks lovely but I’m just not sure there’s enough there.

    • Catalan says:

      Guyana, being a former British colony (British Guyana) will have enough VFR UK based traffic for a twice weekly service, in addition to eco-tourism and offshore oil business.

    • yorkieflyer says:

      Pity not Belize

      • Barry cutters says:

        Belize Is ok but once you’ve dived there again not a lot going for it.
        No beaches either!!

        • yorkieflyer says:

          Oh didn’t know there weren’t any beaches! Read guff saying how marvellous it was!

  • heb999 says:

    Will BA have rights to fly between Guyana and St. Lucia? I would like to go to Guyana for a week and then come back to St. Lucia and relax on a beach for another week.

    • Nick says:

      They will have rights for that if it’s on one ticket – stopovers are ok in almost all circumstances here. If booking the legs separately they need a different level of traffic rights… I don’t know if they do though.

  • Jim says:

    Agreed! Plus it’s super difficult to get taxis in Santorini so you might find yourself stuck there if you want to have a few drinks in the evening, even if you have a car for exploring during the day

    • yorkieflyer says:

      Yes, this and pretty much the same applies to any of the newer resorts, all built on the wrong side of the island

This article is closed to new comments. Feel free to ask your question in the HfP forums.

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