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Hilton gains an attractive new Paris hotel option – Maison Astor

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Hilton has been woefully under-represented in Paris.  Until Hilton Paris Opera opened a couple of years ago, it didn’t have a single property in the main tourist zone.  (Here is our review of Hilton Paris Opera.)

Things are now picking up.  Maison Astor Paris – website here – has joined Hilton as part of the Curio Collection.  Maison Astor Paris sits on a quiet street between the Opera Garnier and the Champs-Elysées, “making the hotel a peaceful hideaway amidst Paris’s bustling city centre.”

Maison Astor Paris joins Hilton's Curio Collection

Curio allows independent properties to retain their own quirks and charms whilst still benefiting from Hilton’s marketing clout.  This includes allowing guests to earn and redeem Hilton Honors points and receive status benefits.

We have reviewed a few Curio hotels and they are generally very good.  Here is our review of the Ames in Boston and here is the Montesol in downtown Ibiza.

The hotel name links back to John Jacob Astor IV who used to live in the hotel when it was a private house, before drowning on the Titanic.  There are 131 recently modernised rooms which “take inspiration from classic Parisian apartments, featuring large windows, beautiful French balconies and high ceilings.”  There is also a fine dining restaurant called Salle à Manger.

Hilton Honors redemptions are capped at 80,000 points per night although I was struggling to find nights over the Winter where it went that high – for November it is usually around 63-68,000.  You find out more about Maison Astor Paris on this page of the Hilton website.


Earn Hilton Honors points from UK credit cards

How to earn Hilton Honors points from UK credit cards (January 2021)

There are various ways of earning Hilton Honors points from UK credit cards.  Many cards also have generous sign-up bonuses!

Do you know that holders of The Platinum Card from American Express receive FREE Hilton Honors Gold status for as long as they hold the card?  It also comes with Marriott Bonvoy Gold, Radisson Rewards Gold, Shangri-La Golden Circle Jade and MeliaRewards Gold status.  We reviewed American Express Platinum in detail here and you can apply here.

American Express Platinum card Amex

The Platinum Card from American Express

30,000 points and an unbeatable set of travel benefits – for a fee Read our full review

Did you know that the Virgin Atlantic credit cards are a great way of earning Hilton Honors points? Two Virgin Points can be converted in three Hilton Honors points. You can apply here.

You can also earn Hilton Honors points indirectly via American Express Gold, the American Express Rewards Credit Card and – for small business owners – American Express Business Gold and Business Platinum.

Click here to read our detailed summary of all UK credit cards which can be used to earn Hilton Honors points

(Want to earn more hotel points?  Click here to see our complete list of promotions from the major hotel chains or use the ‘Hotel Offers’ link in the menu bar at the top of the page.)

Comments (73)

  • Alex Sm says:

    Re bad airlines, especially one particularly BAd airline: despite living in London, I coinciously stopped flying with them unless it’s 1) 241 Amex voucher 2) Vitality-discounted or 3) employer-imposed. You can’t believe how many good choices you have beyond BA: from Aer Lingus and Aegean to Aeroflot and Turkish on short-haul to literally every airline on long-haul!

    • John says:

      So basically you’ll put up with the BAd airline when it’s cheap.

      • Russ says:

        Everyone has their own internal click point of what represents value to them; a low cost carrier to get them to CDG to pick up a long haul QRA380 may be perfectly acceptable whereas just getting to CDG seems like hard work on the same carrier. Just done a trip on Level and really unimpressed and not suitable in my view even for a quick hop. Others may find it perfectly ok. Defining value for others is hard.

      • Louie says:

        For me, BA only when very, very cheap, in fact probably only with a 2-4-1. In general, I will happily pay more to avoid BA. I really don’t want to contribute to the bonuses of the management unless I would be daft to avoid flying them.

    • Darren says:

      Living in London surely your carrier options are pretty high. So why fly BAd?

      • Chris Palmer says:

        To some destinations, at key times, BA remain the only choice. Personally speaking, on the London to Venice route, I’ve never had a problem.

  • Kerry K-C says:

    If anyone has a problem viewing the Forbes article it may be because the referral link seems to get corrupted – the correct link is https://www.forbes.com/sites/christopherelliott/2018/10/07/this-is-the-real-reason-bad-airline-service-is-profitable/#29b5903e5db2

  • Sussex Bantam says:

    Can anyone help me with lounge access options in Barcelona. Travelling on BA with my family so not enough status to get us all into BA lounge. Can my AMEX Plat or Priority Pass access anything useful ?

    • Chris says:

      The only lounge in the BA part of BCN is the Sala VIP Miro, there are no others. Your BA ticket/status will get you in here under the normal rules. Priority pass is accepted but may be restricted – the lounge usually sells tickets but has stopped doing this temporarily as they say they are at capacity, so I wouldn’t like to say if they will accept your PP.

      Note also it is being refurbished from 15th October until next summer, so I expect they will be very tough on access rules, restricting to airline led entry only.

  • ollie says:

    OT – Missing Amex SPG – On Amex Chat yesterday told the points should turn up in 2-4 weeks. Asked for some kind of compensation and was offered 3000 Starpoints.

    • KevMc says:

      My wife’s points for this month have swept across and actually arrived in her Marriott account today!

      …she is still missing her August and September statement points, however.

  • Chris says:

    The ‘why bad airlines are profitable’ article should be called ‘why lack of competition leads to poor service and the ability to charge slightly more’.

    There are at least two factors that have not been considered which mean that the study cited neither proves or disproves the claim. 1- fuel costs, aka the biggest driver of one half of the profitability calculation. 2- competition, aside from a few markets, there is simply no realistic competition from other airlines (or rail) domestically, meaning you can restrict seats enabling you to price fares/fees slightly higher.

    Causation vs correlation….

  • Peter K says:

    In the industry I am in most customers go to the large company that is generally cheaper, is certainly perceived as cheaper, but has the worst customer service. Other companies have also reduced their prices, and quality, to match.

    The airline industry is not alone in this sad state of affairs.