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Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia – a homely heritage stay

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This is our review of the Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, hotel.

You may or may not know that Bogota is home to not just one but two Four Seasons Hotels. A few weeks ago, I was able to stay at both of them following my trip on Iberia’s new A350 ‘Next’ business class seat – review here.

My review of the Four Seasons Bogota is here. As I note in the conclusion, it’s a perfectly good hotel but one which left me wondering why it was a Four Seasons.

In this review, I’ll be taking a look at the Four Seasons Casa Medina – the more historic and more iconic of the two properties.

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Built in 1946 by Colombian artist-architect Santiago Medina Mejia, the Four Seasons Casa Medina features the same red brick exterior as many of Bogota’s gorgeous historic buildings.

Originally an apartment complex, the property was converted into a hotel in the eighties after it was declared a heritage site by Colombian President Belisario Betancur Cuartas. 95% of the historic wood panelling was preserved. It was later further expanded as a Four Seasons and now houses 62 rooms including 19 suites.

Four Seasons provided my room at both hotels for review purposes.

Where is Four Seasons Casa Medina?

Casa Medina is very well located in the city in Zona G. This is an upmarket, largely residential area of the city, close to the financial district and home to many of Bogota’s award-winning restaurants.

The area immediately surrounding the hotel is relatively low-rise and there are plenty of historic villas surrounding the property, with many cafes and restaurants to pick from. I felt perfectly safe walking around and exploring.

You can walk to Chapinero (it takes about 20-30 minutes) where you’ll find plenty of bars and nightlife, including Teatron, the biggest gay club in the world, which I highly recommend. I didn’t expect to find that in Bogota but there you go!

From the airport, it’s about 30-40 minutes drive depending on the traffic, whilst it’s a 20 minute taxi or so into the city centre and Plaza de Bolívar.

Inside the Four Seasons Casa Medina hotel

The main entrance is on the relatively busy Carrera 7 street:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Inside is the main lobby – a small but beautiful space with a staircase as its centrepiece.

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

To the left, you’ll find the reception desks whilst, on the right, a small lobby lounge:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Check-in was quick and easy. I had arranged for my luggage to be transferred from the Four Seasons Bogota whilst I was out on a day trip, and it was already in my room when I arrived.

Rooms at the Four Seasons Casa Medina hotel

I was surprised to find I had been upgraded to one of the top rooms at the hotel – a “Grand Premier Room with Fireplace”. There are suites available above this as well, but this is the top category room.

I visited one of the standard rooms and, to be perfectly honest, the difference (apart from the fireplace) is small. It’s worth noting that as the hotel is a heritage building, each of the rooms is unique.

Here is a standard, entry-level room on the third (top) floor, with lovely exposed timber beams and high ceilings:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Here, meanwhile, is my Grand Premier room:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

There is substantially more space and a sofa area, but the standard room is by no means small and features lots of space around the bed for luggage etc. The bathrooms are virtually identical.

Back to my room. The desk and mini bar are in a dark-sort of entry hallway:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

I would have preferred the desk somewhere brighter, in the main bedroom, because I don’t particularly like working in the dark!

The mini bar featured a Nespresso coffee machine and kettle. Tea and coffee were free, but the fully stocked fridge below and the snacks on offer were charged for.

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

The room itself is big. Too big? I often find myself a bit lost in hotel rooms of this size. There’s just so much unused space:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Immediately in front is the sofa and coffee table in front of the stunning fireplace:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

and

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

This is the first time I’ve stayed at a hotel with a working fireplace, and I have to say I loved it. The hotel staff will come and start it for you and clean it out the following morning. It was so cosy in the cool Bogota evening – the perfect place to nurse myself back to health following a heavy Saturday night at Teatron!

The bed is opposite the fireplace and features a huge (American?) king-size, with plenty of pillows to choose from:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Bedside tables are on both sides and feature nifty US-style plug sockets in the drawers themselves.

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

To get to the bathroom you walk through a large walk-in wardrobe:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Again, this space felt underused. Why not put in a dressing table at the end for people to get ready?

The granite bathroom is next door and relatively spacious, although like the other Four Seasons in Bogota only features a shower and single basin. I’m told baths are rare in Bogota, but the room is certainly large enough to add one.

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

and

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Toiletries are the same as the other Four Seasons, Acacia del Amazonas by Loto Del Sur:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Spa and gym at the Four Seasons Casa Medina hotel

Again, amenities are limited here. There is a small spa and gym in the basement. I did have a look at the spa menu but prices were toppy, even for a luxury hotel. The gym was decent, with cardio machines recessed into the floor to give people a bit more space when running etc:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Breakfast at Four Seasons Casa Medina

Unlike the Four Seasons Bogota, Casa Medina does offer a full breakfast buffet. This is served in the stunning glazed courtyard:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

There are few places better to enjoy breakfast than in a stylish, light-filled room such as this. It costs approximately £25.

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

The buffet was small but good:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Fresh fruits, fruit juices, yoghurts and more were available:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Cold cuts including Iberian ham, smoked salmon, cheese etc:

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Some local things including arepas as well as bacon and sausages were available at the hot station, but eggs were all made to order from the eggs station. They were able to make excellent omelettes, poached eggs etc.

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Overall the buffet was not huge but it felt high quality.

Review: Four Seasons Casa Medina, Bogota, Colombia

Conclusion

In many ways, the Four Seasons Bogota and the Four Seasons Casa Medina are not that dissimilar. They’re roughly the same size, are managed (I believe) by the same GM, feature similar bathrooms and have identical toiletries.

But what the Four Seasons Casa Medina brings is a sense of heritage and homeliness. The hotel genuinely feels like it could have been someone’s home. There is a sense of place and history, with beautiful original interiors and genuine open fireplaces.

Price-wise, the two hotels seem to offer similar rates, with rooms as low as £300. Given that, I’d always choose Casa Medina – it’s an excellent city hotel. You can find out more, and book, on the hotel website here.

How to book Four Seasons Casa Medina

Four Seasons does not run a loyalty scheme so there is no option to redeem free nights.

Since 2017 we have partnered with Emyr Thomas who runs Bon Vivant, a London-based luxury travel agent. He works with Four Seasons (amongst others) as a Preferred Partner and is able to guarantee a range of additional benefits when you book with him including breakfast, credits and upgrades.

Emyr can usually match any rate offered via the Four Seasons website and get you the above benefits added on.  There are no booking fees and you pay at check-out as usual. You can contact Emyr via our online form here.

Our partnership with Emyr has been going for many years now and you will regularly see readers praising his service in the comments, so it is well worth booking with him. 


Hotel offers update – May 2024:

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Comments (60)

This article is closed to new comments. Feel free to ask your question in the HfP forums.

  • JDB says:

    This hotel does look a whole lot better than the other Four Seasons. There is a theme here – hotels that have been developed by others, then taken over by Four Seasons are often a whole lot better than ones where they have been involved from the outset, when they shrink the rooms, standardise (to look more Ritz Carlton) and focus on what works for the company rather than guests.

  • Gordon says:

    Thanks for the review Rhys,
    I like this hotel, particularly the glazed courtyard and the staircase, a little on the high end, cost wise for me unfortunately.
    I know many posters have visited Colombia, So any recommendations for mid range properties in Bogotá, Medellín, and cartagena would be appreciated, as have a 3 week trip on the 27/12/24.

    • Maria J says:

      We stayed at the JW Marriott Hotel Bogota and loved it. There was another area that we like ‘Chico Reservado’ with lots of restaurants.

    • Stuart says:

      Currently staying around the corner from this Four Seasons in the Artisan DC (Mariott) hotel. A really small property with great rooms, staff and food.

    • Throwawayname says:

      I have stayed in the NH Metrotel and, similar to most hotels in that chain, it ticked all the boxes, was reasonably priced, and should be a very solid choice for anyone who isn’t looking for a ’boutique’ ambience or immersive high-touch luxury levels of service (don’t get me wrong – they are perfectly courteous and helpful etc, just don’t go in expecting a personal butler etc).

    • KS says:

      Hilton Bogota is worth considering in my opinion. It is in this area, very close to the Artisan. It’s nothing ‘wow’ but I’ve stayed there twice without complaint. Prices are good, food (especially breakfast) good, the outdoor pool is decent and usually empty plus the rooms are of a decent standard and seem to have been refurbished relatively recently. Worth adding that when I stayed there I had no Hilton status so it wasn’t like I was getting any sort of special treatment.

  • Maria J says:

    Re Cartagena we stayed at Hotel Movich Cartagena De Indias. The hotel itself was ok but the sunroof area wasn’t very comfortable. The Sophia across the road look better. I would recommend the walled city, felt very safe and full of restaurants.

  • lumma says:

    Was there no television in the room?

    • JDB says:

      It would seem an awfully long way to go to watch some telly. If there isn’t a television or it’s hidden, that’s a big plus.

      • Gordon says:

        +1 – I can honestly say that I have never switched on a TV in any hotel for many years, and I have traveled to many.

        • Rob says:

          Join the club.

          However, iOS 17.3 has a new feature to allow AirPlay to work on hotel TVs, as long as the TV is compatible. This may lead to more people using the TV purely to cast content from their phone (something Chromecast has allowed for years of course).

      • ken says:

        If I’m travelling for work, then sometimes a TV is useful to catch up on news or sport.

        On holiday ? No

        The same goes for TV in bedrooms at home. Definite no.

        • TGLoyalty says:

          You don’t catch up with the news on holiday?

          Don’t get in after along day of sight seeing and put on Netflix while you relax in bed?

          • Gordon says:

            When I’m on holiday I am glad to get away from the news, as it’s a holiday to get away from the normal grind of life. Have we become so obsessed with the news that we can’t spend at least a 7 to 14 day break without it. As for Netflix in the evening, I prefer to spend some time in a local drinking establishment or indeed the hotel restaurant and after in the bar socialising then going to the room to sleep.

  • Lady London says:

    Nice review, Rhys

    Wondering why the San Sebastian ex-coffee bean sacks screening the egg station table at the back, are hanging upside down from the table.

    • Gordon says:

      When the server looks over, they are the correct way round!
      Also the socket hanging off the wall behind the hot station!

  • Stuart says:

    I had a drink in the bar of this hotel last night. You say it’s 20 minutes from Chapinero, isn’t it slap bang in the middle of Chapinero and less than a minutes walk away from the restaurants and bars?

  • C says:

    Kudos but you must be off your proverbial rocker going to Colombia. That’s right up there on my list next to: Kyiv, Tel Aviv, El Salvador, anywhere in Ecuador and anywhere in Mexico.

    • cin3 says:

      One of the most ignorant and outdated comments I’ve ever read on this site and that’s saying a lot.

      • C says:

        Oh take a breath @cin3, I didn’t think it would take long for somebody to proclaim “my ignorance”.

        You’ll have to take my word for the fact I’ve travelled the globe extensively (excl. aforementioned high risk, yet attractive in parts I’m sure, destinations) however I respect you are entitled to bleat about somebody else’s views.

        • Gordon says:

          https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/colombia

          There’s plenty of places to visit in Colombia that are safe, if our government says it safe, well that’s good enough for me, there’s areas of London I would not visit for fear of becoming another crime statistic! I am looking forward to my 3 week tour of Colombia, including Bogota, Medellin and Cartagena at the end of the year. The only thing I’m not looking forward to is the high altitude in Bogota!

        • cin3 says:

          You’ll have to take my word for the fact I’ve spent many many months travelling in Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador and El Salvador and there is no way you would have said that from direct experience.

          Frankly I have never understood where people get off scaring people off some of the most interesting, beautiful and kind destinations in the world with their own small-minded, irrational and objectively false views.

          • Gordon says:

            Agreed- I think the vast majority of hfp readers are pretty savvy and are aware that these countries are safe to visit, I’m not put off. I actually booked Colombia after reading posters comments on hfp saying how beautiful Colombia was. I am looking forward to my visit.

          • C says:

            Well, I’ll be content with my own “small-minded, irrational and objectively false views” then.

            P.S. you might also want to contact several dozen countries to advise them that their own travel advice is irrational and objectively false to.
            The USA, Australia, numerous EU countries et al. all cite equivalent scales of risk.
            Are they also “scaring off” people then?

            (Source: UK.Gov)
            “Despite improvements in security, crime rates remain high in Colombia. Illegal armed groups and other criminal groups are heavily involved in the drugs trade and serious crime including kidnapping (for ransom and political purposes), money laundering and running extortion and prostitution rackets.
            Street crime is a problem in major cities, including Bogota, Medellin, Cali and the Caribbean coast. Mugging and pickpocketing can be accompanied by violence. British nationals have been robbed at gun point in the Candelaria area of Bogotá“

            Adiós (literally) muchacha…

This article is closed to new comments. Feel free to ask your question in the HfP forums.

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