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Hilton now lets you GUARANTEE connecting rooms – so I booked two

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The inability to guarantee connecting hotel rooms has been a MASSIVE bug bear of mine. To be honest, it is no longer such a big issue as our children get older, but we struggled with it for years.

Is it really so difficult to guarantee connecting rooms? It seems so. Whilst an airline can happily run a seating map for every single flight for the next year, it appears that hotels cannot run forward room plans. They can sell a certain number of rooms per night in each category but are incapable of doing much else.

Hilton now lets you GUARANTEE connecting rooms

It isn’t just budget and mid-range hotels which struggle with this. In experience, you are just as likely to have trouble at five star properties. One of the biggest benefits of working with Emyr Thomas at Bon Vivant to book hotels for my personal stays is that he will, if we have requested connecting rooms, call his contact at the hotel on the day of arrival. Because hotels don’t like annoying Virtuoso agents, because of the profile of their client base, it gets done. (This isn’t special treatment for me, by the way. He will do it on your bookings too.)

Hilton has now pulled off the necessary IT, and you can book connecting rooms at many hotels via the website.

How do Hilton’s connecting rooms work?

The trigger for launching this, it seems, was Hilton’s new Motto chain. This is a new budget brand which “offers an expanded connecting room concept where guests have the ability to book up to nine unique connecting room configurations with adaptable furniture and modern design to create the ideal accommodation and social environment for group travel.

Once Hilton was forced to develop the necessary IT to link rooms together in order for Motto to work, it was relatively simple to roll it out chainwide for bog-standard pairs of connecting rooms.

It is very simple. I have just booked two at the Hampton hotel at Stansted Airport which I reviewed last year and is pictured above. It is a perfectly acceptable property and just a few seconds walk from the terminal building, albeit that you do need to go outside to reach it.

When you come to book on hilton.com, you will see a little box you can tick:

Hilton connecting rooms

If you don’t see this, your hotel is not currently offering the service.

Select this and it will remove rooms types which cannot be connected. Make sure that you select ‘two rooms’ in the booking system and book as usual. That’s it.

If you are starting with a city-wide search (eg ‘London’, rather than ‘Hilton Paddington’) then ticking this box will remove hotels which cannot guarantee connecting rooms, allowing you choose from those that remain.

Once booked, you see this confirmation message:

Hilton connecting hotel rooms

An extra benefit for Hilton, of course, is that you need to book direct to get this benefit rather than via an intermediary. It saves the cost of those pesky 22% commissions to Hotels.com etc ….

You can find out more about connecting rooms on this special page of the Hilton website.

Comments (31)

  • Alex says:

    Never understood why this was such a problem – we have three boys under 7 and regularly are giving “connecting rooms” on separate floors etc.

    If a chain can finally get this right I would use them every time.

  • The Savage Squirrel says:

    Very welcome addition. Smart timely move too, as, in a world of less business travel, attracting family leisure travel is that much more important.

  • 1ATL says:

    The Vacation Collection product via Amex Platinum and Centurion offers guaranteed connecting rooms at time of booking to properties in their family programme. They also come at a 50% discount on the second room when occupied by children.

  • ADS says:

    Having done group room allocations at a huge hotel in a past life, blocking out connecting rooms can push you into being overbooked if you’re running close to capacity with multiple different arrival and departure dates.

    The comparison with flights is with airlines that do multiple short hops with people getting on and off at different times (like some Wideroe flights in Norway) – and I’m pretty sure they don’t use seat reservations.

  • Mikeact says:

    My wife and I love connecting rooms……she’s a heavy sleeper, if you get my drift.

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