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My review of the Aer Lingus lounge in Dublin Airport Terminal 2

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This is my review of the Aer Lingus lounge at Dublin Airport.

This is the last part of my Boston trip reviews.  The main article – if you only have time to read one part of this series – is my Aer Lingus Business class flight review here.  My Ames Boston Hotel review (part of Hilton’s Curio Collection) is here and the other three lounge reviews from the trip are here, here and here.

The Aer Lingus lounge in Dublin was lounge number 4 on this trip.

According to my boarding pass I only had 20 minutes to check out the lounge in between my Boston – Dublin and Dublin – Heathrow flights. Due to a delay I had about an hour in the end, but I didn’t find out about the delay until I was standing at the gate and when I got back to the lounge I only had a further 20 minutes.  If I had known about the delay when I got to the lounge I could have taken my first ever lounge-shower 🙂

Where is the Aer Lingus lounge in Dublin’s Terminal 2?

Aer Lingus only operates three lounges directly – at London Heathrow, which I reviewed as part of this series, at New York JFK Terminal 5 and this one, in Dublin Terminal 2.  Full details are on the Aer Lingus website here.  It is worth noting that you can pay day passes for all three lounges as long as you are flying Aer Lingus.

The Aer Lingus lounge is located in Terminal 2 about a 3 minute walk from the stairs that lead down to pre-clearance.

(It is worth noting that, if you are flying from Dublin to the USA, Aer Lingus no longer lets you use this lounge and the airport-operated ’51st and Green’ pre-clearance lounge on the same trip.  I would suggest you get pre-clearance out of the way ASAP and use ’51st and Green’ as you can then go straight to the gate from the lounge.)

I showed my Dublin – Heathrow ticket at the desk which didn’t indicate that I had arrived in Business Class.  I was told it wasn’t valid, but when I told her I had arrived in Business Class on the Boston flight she waved me through without asking to see a boarding pass.

The lounge wasn’t too busy and had various seating areas.

As you walked in you found yourself in a spacious area with armchairs and coffee tables.

This area also had a ‘business centre’ – or rather desks with plugs and print facilities – as well as flight screens.

The split-level lounge was very bright with floor to ceiling windows and even a plane suspended from the ceiling.

Underneath the mezzanine level was the breakfast buffet with pastries, rolls and cheese. There was also fresh orange juice and most importantly at this time of day a coffee machine – and the coffee was good.

At the far end of the lounge was a further smaller sitting area.

aer lingus dublin lounge

In front of that sitting area was the staircase to the mezzanine level.

Upstairs was another coffee and drinks station with snacks,

…. more seating and the toilets and shower rooms.

As mentioned earlier I would have loved to take a shower but as I didn’t know about my flight delay when I entered the lounge, I gave it a miss.

There were only two ladies toilets and even though the lounge wasn’t too busy, there was always a line. I assume it can get quite bad during busier times.

Conclusion

The Aer Lingus lounge is very well lit and inviting thanks to the floor to ceiling windows. More breakfast items would have been great, especially if you’re used to the breakfast options in the British Airways Galleries lounges in London, but overall the lounge is a good place to spend some time in transit or before a flight.

And that is the end of this trip report.  Thank you for sticking with it if you have read every part.  If you missed any of it, the links are in the first paragraph.

If you want to know more about redeeming your Avios for long-haul flights to North America on Aer Lingus, this HfP article is a good overview of how to do it. The process is tricky because of the different options available via avios.com and ba.com.

For Summer 2018 they will be flying to

  • Miami (3 per week)
  • New York (21 per week)
  • Boston (14 per week)
  • Chicago (14 per week)
  • San Francisco (7 per week)
  • Orlando (4 per week)
  • Philadelphia (4 per week)
  • Seattle (4 per week)
  • Toronto (7 per week)
  • Washington (7 per week)
  • Los Angeles (7 per week)
  • Hartford (7 per week)

…… so there are plenty of options.  Thanks to Paula and Eileen at Aer Lingus for their help in putting the trip together.


How to earn Avios points from UK credit cards

How to earn Avios from UK credit cards (August 2022)

As a reminder, there are various ways of earning Avios points from UK credit cards.  Many cards also have generous sign-up bonuses!

In February 2022, Barclaycard launched two exciting new Barclaycard Avios Mastercard cards with a bonus of up to 25,000 Avios. You can apply here.

You qualify for the bonus on these cards even if you have a British Airways American Express card:

Barclaycard Avios Plus card

Barclaycard Avios Plus Mastercard

25,000 Avios for signing up and an upgrade voucher for spending £10,000 Read our full review

Barclaycard Avios card

Barclaycard Avios Mastercard

5,000 Avios for signing up and an upgrade voucher for spending £20,000 Read our full review

There are two official British Airways American Express cards with attractive sign-up bonuses:

British Airways BA Premium Plus American Express Amex credit card

British Airways American Express Premium Plus

25,000 Avios and the UK’s most valuable card perk – the 2-4-1 voucher Read our full review

British Airways BA Amex American Express card

British Airways American Express

5,000 Avios for signing up and an Economy 2-4-1 voucher for spending £12,000 Read our full review

You can also get generous sign-up bonuses by applying for American Express cards which earn Membership Rewards points.

EDIT: Until 25th October 2022, there is an exceptionally generous sign-up bonus on The Platinum Card. You will receive 60,000 Membership Rewards points – double the usual amount – and £200 to spend at Amex Travel. You need to spend £6,000 within six months to earn the bonus.

American Express Amex Gold

American Express Preferred Rewards Gold

Your best beginner’s card – 20,000 points, FREE for a year & two airport lounge passes Read our full review

American Express Platinum card Amex

The Platinum Card from American Express

60,000 points, £200 travel credit and an unbeatable set of travel benefits – for a fee Read our full review

Run your own business?

We recommend Capital On Tap for limited companies. You earn 1 Avios per £1 which is impressive for a Visa card, along with a sign-up bonus worth 10,000 Avios.

Capital On Tap Business Rewards Visa

10,500 points bonus – the most generous Avios Visa for a limited company Read our full review

You should also consider the British Airways Accelerating Business credit card. This is open to sole traders as well as limited companies and has a 30,000 Avios sign-up bonus.

British Airways Accelerating Business American Express card

British Airways Accelerating Business American Express

30,000 Avios sign-up bonus – plus annual bonuses of up to 30,000 Avios Read our full review

There are also generous bonuses on the two American Express Business cards, with the points converting at 1:1 into Avios. These cards are open to sole traders as well as limited companies.

Amex Platinum Business American Express

American Express Business Platinum

40,000 points sign-up bonus and a long list of travel benefits Read our full review

American Express Business Gold

20,000 points sign-up bonus and free for a year Read our full review

Click here to read our detailed summary of all UK credit cards which earn Avios. This includes both personal and small business cards.

(Want to earn more Avios?  Click here to visit our home page for our latest articles on earning and spending your Avios points and click here to see how to earn more Avios this month from offers and promotions.)

Comments (6)

This article is closed to new comments. Feel free to ask your question in the HfP forums.

  • Alex W says:

    Worth noting that if you’re using BA Silver to get in Aer Lingus don’t let you take a guest. I didn’t know this and found the staff were pretty rude about it. Having sent off Mrs W to go shopping, they were also unapologetic about the total lack of any hot food other than soup. Also the drinks options were poor and the seats were uncomfortable. Not an experience I would want to repeat.

  • Zoe says:

    We visited this lounge the first time my daughters flew Business class. They were very excited about the whole thing (young teens) dressed up, and walked through the terminal well ahead of us. They absolutely loved it and the service in the small business class cabin was fantasticly friendly. They still love to travel business (all thanks to Rob and this site) but it now lacks the joy of that first experience. I am so grateful for all Rob and Anika’s efforts since Rob first answered queries years ago on Paid to Shop. Thanks too to all of the contributors in the comments.

  • Martin says:

    “(It is worth noting that, if you are flying from Dublin to the USA, Aer Lingus no longer lets you use this lounge and the airport-operated ’51st and Green’ pre-clearance lounge on the same trip. I would suggest you get pre-clearance out of the way ASAP and use ’51st and Green’ as you can then go straight to the gate from the lounge.)”

    This is very helpful, thank you, because I am flying DUB-SFO next week and had assumed I could use both lounges. The last time I took this flight, the post-clearance lounge didn’t exist, and so you had to gauge the amount of time pre-clear would take (can be a lot) because once you were the other side, there was no lounge. Now there is, of course.

    I also saw people missing flights because pre-clear took too long. Problem.

    Ideally they’d have a branch of pre-clear in the first lounge and then let you through to the post-clear lounge, but I guess that’s phase three. Or phase never.

  • Nick says:

    Anika please don’t take this as a criticism but more as something constructive… I know English isn’t your first language, but HfP is England-based and has a majority European audience, so can we please try to keep to English-English? We stand in ‘a queue’ and ‘centre’… there are more and more Americanisms creeping into your reviews!

    Helpful review though, thanks 🙂

    • Rob says:

      If you had met Anika’s boyfriend you would know why 🙂

      • the real harry1 says:

        probably a good idea if Nick doesn’t actually meet Anika’s boyfriend 🙂

This article is closed to new comments. Feel free to ask your question in the HfP forums.

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